10 Tips for Success for Engineering Students

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If you’re a current engineering student, here are ways to put yourself on the fast track to success.

Here are his best tips, most of which would work for any career-aspiring college student:

1. Identify the people who inspire you, and find out what makes them tick. If you love Apple products, Steve Jobs may be your idol, or perhaps you love the Segway and its creator, Dean Kamen. You can easily find out a lot of information about Jobs and Kamen—or just about any other prominent person in technology—so use it to look into what’s helped these people and their companies become so successful. Then emulate their good traits in your personal, scholastic, and professional life.
2. Develop a portfolio of projects. Participate in every hands-on, experiential learning opportunity that a balanced schedule allows. This way, you’ll have something unique to show a prospective employer (or venture capitalist) when you graduate, while other students will only be able to list their courses. In addition, you’ll be far more likely to retain the knowledge you’ve gained in classes because you’ll be applying it and, in the process, boosting your communication and interpersonal skills.
3. Learn the value of networking. When it comes to being a leader, whom you know is almost as important as what you know. Attend lectures on your campus and introduce yourself to the speakers. Check with your school’s alumni association to get a list of alumni from your program who want to connect with undergraduates.
4-Star Tip. In addition to E-mail, you can use LinkedIn or other social media tools to connect online. But remember: There’s no substitute for a traditional, face-to-face meeting, so if you can find a way to meet in person, that’s always the best.
4. Work in teams as much as you can. Whether it’s creating a solar-powered car, participating in a sport, or writing for the school paper, get involved with an organization that requires a team effort to produce great results. Throughout your career, you can be sure you’ll work in teams, and the skills you develop in school will help prepare you to lead teams when you graduate.
5. Seek informal leadership roles. You’re always a leader, whether you’re officially in charge of a team or not. Sounds counterintuitive, but you can lead from any position in an organization by influencing how people work together and how they make decisions. Usually people think that the leader is the president or the manager, but if you learn how to recognize and deal with various leadership styles from any position in a team, you’ll be seen as a leader when you take on your first job or internship.
6. Find your flawsand fix them. As with any skill, leadership needs constant improvement. When you are part of a team, try to create a way to get feedback from team members, group leaders, and professors. When you have concrete feedback on how people view you, you can work to improve your skills, including communication and leadership. Plus, you’ll learn how to accept—and give—constructive criticism. That’s absolutely necessary for your future career.
7. Take a business class. As an engineer, it’s not enough for you to be technically proficient; you need to have business savvy. If you’re going to be a leader, you need to understand what a P&L is (also known as an income statement), read organization charts, know how to negotiate contracts, and be familiar with the myriad other functions that every top engineer needs to know. Otherwise, you won’t understand what to do when an accountant, lawyer, or middle manager gets in the way. A business course or two can take you a long way, and these classes are often easier to pass than your calculus course!
8. Take design and other humanities classes. There’s a wide world out there beyond problem sets, laboratories, and theory. Take a visual design course so you’ll learn to represent ideas graphically. Take a cognitive science course to learn how people interpret the world and understand it. Take a literature course to develop your knowledge and appreciation of the classic books, which will help you write and communicate more effectively.
5-Star Tip. Tomorrow’s leaders will have to communicate effectively across international borders and be familiar with other cultures, so develop some proficiency in another language, travel abroad, or meet students from other cultures. Start “globalizing” right at college.
9. Make your summers productive. Employers place tremendous value on practical experience. Seek out internship opportunities actively and early in your academic career. Try to demonstrate through your internships a series of evolving leadership experiences, and use the internships to build your portfolio of actual projects/products. New graduates who can show a commitment to using their summer to continue to learn are always viewed more seriously by a prospective employer.
10. Recruit and develop your personal board of directors. As an undergraduate, you might feel alone when confronted with hard decisions about the courses to take, jobs to apply for, or even balancing school work and your personal life. You won’t feel alone if you develop a personal board of directors just for you. Just as a company has a board that guides the organization, you can stock your board with professionals from organizations and companies, as well as former teachers and knowledgeable family friends.
Extra Pointer. Be sure to “nurture” your board of directors: Keep in touch with them, provide them regular updates, ask them for guidance, and be sure to thank them for any help they provide. And don’t be afraid of conflicting advice. If members offer different suggestions, you’ll have the occasion to balance off one idea against another and make your own decision—just like at a real company.
 

The difference between civil engineering and structural engineering

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Posted in CIVIL ENGINEERING

Civil and structural engineering are two engineering disciplines. The engineering disciplines deal with designing, evaluation, preservation and construction of elements. The difference between civil engineering and structural engineering is tricky. This is because the task of discerning the two disciplines would be difficult before understanding the concepts behind each of the careers.

Civil engineering

This is one of the oldest engineering disciplines. Its history dates back to the ancient times when people began building shelters for themselves. The engineering discipline is offered in the universities and the field of specialization includes: roads, water treatment, canals and dams.

Civil engineering is offered in the university has a four year full time course. After graduation, civil engineers join subdisciplines of civil engineering.Therefore, it is very rare to find a course referred to as masters in civil engineering. The disciplines of civil engineering includes: Geotechnical engineering, transportation engineering, structural engineering and environmental engineering.

Structural engineering

Structural engineering deals with the designing, Analysis, building and maintenance of resisting or load bearing structures. Examples of those structures are: bridges, skyscrapers and dams. This is an engineering field which is offered in the universities as a subject under civil engineering and as a specialization which results in master’s degree or PhD.

What is the difference between civil engineering and structural engineering?

Even though both engineering disciplines belong to the same field, they vary in several aspects. One of the differences is that civil engineering focuses on design elements while structural engineering is more concern on inspecting the materials used for construction. The structural engineers are the one who are supposed to ensure that the materials used for construction can support the design of the structure.

Another difference between the two engineering courses is that civil engineering is offered as the first degree while structural engineering is offered as the 2nd or 3rd degree in engineering. A civil engineer is expected to perform the duties of a structural engineer. However, the vise versa is not true. In fact, structural engineering is a subject which is under civil engineering and it is also offered as masters or doctorate degree.

In conclusion, the two degree courses are very crucial when it comes to design and construction jobs. As a result, the engineering firms provide both civil and structural engineering services to its clients. Therefore, both engineering courses are significant in any of the construction or development projects.If you need to pursue any of the careers, it is important that you understand the differences mentioned above.

WHAT IS CIVIL ENGINEERING…

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Posted in CIVIL ENGINEERING

Civil engineering is everything you see thats been built all around us. Its about railways, schools, offices, hospitals, water , power supply and much more. The kinds of things we take for granted but would find life abit challenging to live without.

Civil engineers have helped design, plan and build all of them, engineers work with planners, architects and construction teams to make it happen.

 

WHAT DO CIVIL ENGINEERS DO?

Civil engineers conceive, design, build, supervise, operate, construct and maintain infrastructure projects and systems in the public and private sector, including roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges and systems for water supply and sewage treatment.